Forum Posts

happymanesrabbitry
Mar 15, 2021
In Bunny Health 101
We all want our pets to be in the best health possible. Year after year many are looking into pet insurance as an alternative to balance the costs of medical treatments, yearly check-ups, or even medication. If you don’t know where to start looking, this resource about pet insurance companies can help you to save time on research. This provides insights on the pricing, coverage and additional benefits.
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happymanesrabbitry
Jun 24, 2019
In Through A Bunny's Eyes
From their big fluffy ears to their twitching nose and their wide round eyes, your bunny experiences the world from a very different perspective. Vision Due to their lateral placement on the face, rabbits have an almost 360 degree field of vision. The only exceptions are blind spots directly in front of their nose, under their chin, and directly behind them. This is one reason why you frequently see them standing up on their back legs and tilting their heads from side to side. Rabbits are partially colorblind as they cannot distinguish the difference between red and green and they are sensitive to red light. This makes it difficult for your bunny to notice the difference between certain treats and toys! They are also farsighted meaning that they have a hard time focusing on objects that are close by. However, they can focus a bit better than humans on far away objects. being farsighted also gives a rabbit poor depth perception which can cause safety concerns if they are in high places. It also helps to explain why your bunny becomes fearful even if a perceived threat is far away from them. Rabbits are crepuscular meaning they see better during the low light hours of dusk and dawn. Their eyes are 8 times more sensitive to light than human eyes which means that they have difficulty seeing in very bright or very low light. Better vision in the early morning and evening helps explain why rabbits tend to be more active at these times. Because they lack a light amplifying structure called a Tapetum, a rabbit's vision is also grainy. Hearing A rabbit's ears are very distinct. There is no doubt that you have seen your long eared pet swiveling his ears from side to side as he scans the environment. The unique shape acts as mini sound amplifiers allowing your furry little bunny to hear at a level much higher than humans. A rabbit can hear from a range of 360-42,000 htz whereas a human's hearing ranges from 64-23,000 htz. They can also swivel their ears in different directions in order to best determine the direction a sound is coming from. This is important to keep in mind when you are thinking of playing loud music or turning up the volume on your television. It also helps to explain why your bunny always seems to hear you coming when it's time to go to bed or why they can hear a bag of treats being opened from the other side of the house! Smell Rabbits also have an excellent sense of smell! They have 100 million scent receptors making them very sensitive to strong odors such as perfumes and air fresheners. For this reason, rabbits are very susceptible to upper respiratory infections. The distinctive bunny nose twitch is believed to be a way for rabbits to inhale more air allowing more scent particles to reach their scent receptors. When your bunny is relaxed, you likely will see less nose twitching as she does not feel the need to be on alert for potential danger. Taste Your bunny has upwards of 17,000 taste buds allowing them to distinguish between sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. This is more than humans which only have 10,000. more taste buds means that wild rabbits can tell the difference between toxic and non-toxic plants, but due to the lack of necessity, your pet bunny may lose this this ability. Touch A rabbit's whiskers help them to determine the size of an opening in comparison to their body proportions. Much like a cat, a rabbit's whiskers are as long as their body is wide. They are located on the mouth, nose, cheeks and above the eyes. They are very sensitive to touch allowing them to adequately determine spacial orientation. Resources https://www.vgr1.com/vision/ https://www.calgaryhumane.ca/how-rabbits-hear-the-long-and-short-of-bunny-ears/ https://www.lsu.edu/deafness/HearingRange.html https://pethelpful.com/rabbits/Why-Do-Rabbits-Noses-Twitch https://www.petplace.com/article/small-mammals/general/rabbit-senses-what-is-it-like-in-their-world/
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happymanesrabbitry
Mar 04, 2019
In Bunny Health 101
We all love our bunnies and as pet parents, we want only the best for our little furry friends. As a whole, rabbits tend to be quite resilient and healthy pets. However, when they do become ill, it can be a scary and dangerous time for both owner and bunny! We have compiled a list of six of the most common illnesses seen in rabbits in the U.S and how to prevent them affecting your little fur baby. 1. GI Stasis This is a condition that causes a rabbit's GI tract to slow down or stop. This is usually due to a build up of fur (hairballs) along with an inadequate amount of fiber and water. This is a very concerning and deadly problem as most rabbits do not show signs of illness until well into the progression of the condition. If you notice that your bunny is not having regular stools, acting overly sleepy, or not eating normally you should have them evaluated by a rabbit veterinarian immediately! Your vet will most likely treat your bunny with fluids and electrolyte supplements along with slowly re-introducing appropriate solid foods. Prevention is key in GI Stasis! Your bunny should have unlimited access to fresh Timothy hay or Orchard grass as well as a constant supply of fresh water. Some experts believe that providing a water bowl rather than a dripper bottle encourages increased fluid intake. Some other things to consider are proper grooming and exercise. Long fur can build up in your bunny's GI tract causing blockages. Unlike cats, your bunny cannot expel these "hair balls" but with regular grooming to remove loose fur, you can help prevent this. If you are unsure as to how to properly groom your bunny, we offer grooming packages in our shop. You can also contact us for advice on grooming. Also, when bunnies get bored they may begin "fur chewing" where they quite literally pull their fur. This habit is best prevented by providing regular exercise and mental stimulation. Proper exercise also encourages GI motility. Yet another method of prevention is to ensure that your rabbit's teeth are properly maintained. While we discuss malocclusion later in this article, it is important to note that if your bunny's teeth are not properly worn down, they can lose the ability to eat properly and they can end up in severe pain both of which are common causes of GI Stasis. 2. Pasteurellosis (Pasteurella) Pasteurella is a bacterial infection that can affect your bunny's eyes, ears, nose, bone, or skin. However, it is most commonly manifested as Snuffles, a mild upper respiratory infection with symptoms similar to that of a human cold. If you begin to notice any watery discharge from your bunny's eyes or nose, excessive sneezing, or any change in his/her appetite they should be seen by a rabbit veterinarian. Pasteurella is most commonly treated with a course of antibiotics. Prevention of a pasteurella infection can be a little more tricky as all rabbits naturally have the bacteria that causes the infection in their system. The rabbit usually only becomes ill if their immune system has already become compromised. One of the simplest ways to prevent this illness is to ensure a clean environment for your bunny. This includes cleaning his/her pen regularly with antibacterial cleansers and ensuring the removal of wet, dirty hay, food, and toys daily. Your bunny should have unlimited access to fresh Timothy hay and water. Regular offerings of bunny appropriate fruit and vegetables will also go a long way in keeping your bunny's immune system in top shape! 3. Dental Malocclusion A rabbit's teeth are constantly growing. Therefore, without proper care your bunny can develop painful overgrowth causing ulcers, malnutrition, stasis, and severe pain. Treatment can involve painful and sometimes risky oral surgery to file down your bunny's overgrown teeth and repair any damage caused by the overgrowth. The condition, known as malocclusion is one of the easiest to prevent. Your bunny requires constant access to fresh Timothy hay as well as multiple options for safe chew toys. You can provide your bunny with fresh apple or pine twigs as well as commercially available chew blocks. We also offer a variety of handmade, natural chew toys in our shop. Your bunny should also be evaluated by a rabbit veterinarian at least once a year to ensure proper dental health. 4. Ear Mites & Fleas If your bunny ever goes outdoors or comes in contact with dogs and cats, they may become infected with ear mites or fleas. Signs of ear mites can include excessive itching along with noticeable flakes or "dandruff" in your bunny's ears. Signs of fleas are similar to that of a flea infestation in cats or dogs, excessive itching and visible fleas or "flea dirt" on your rabbit's skin. If you notice either of these nasty little parasites on your bunny, you should contact your rabbit veterinarian. If left untreated, ear mites can lead to inner ear damage or a condition called Torticollis. You will also need to treat your home with flea or mite preventative measures such as carpet powders, dog & cat flea medications, and washing of all linens and clothing in the home. Be sure to check your bunny over thoroughly after any outdoor play and talk to your rabbit vet if you suspect that any other household animals may be infected. We do not recommend over the counter flea & tick treatments as the ingredients in some of the common brands are deadly to rabbits. Please check with your vet for an appropriate flea & mite treatment medication. 5. Heat Exhaustion Rabbits are very sensitive to extremes in temperature. This is one of the main reasons we recommend housing your bunny indoors in a temperature controlled environment. If your bunny becomes too warm, they can suffer from heat exhaustion or heat stroke. We cover this condition in depth in our Beat the Heat: Helping Your Bunny Stay Cool all Summer Long post. The important thing to remember is that if you recognize any signs of overheating in your bunny, begin cooling measures such as utilizing fans and cooling blankets and seek advice from your rabbit veterinarian. Be sure to always provide unlimited fresh, cool water and shade for your bunny, especially in hot weather. 6. Viral Hemmorrhagic Disease We recently posted on this devastating disease as well (see Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease: Is my Bunny at Risk?) However, with the recent outbreaks in the continental U.S, it has made our list of more common rabbit illnesses. This disease, also known as RHV or RCV, is fast progressing and deadly. Usually, there are no symptoms, however if your rabbit does show signs of this disease, they can exhibit decreased to no appetite, fever, lethargy, and collapse, seizure and coma, difficulty breathing, foaming at the mouth, or bloody nasal discharge. This disease is highly contagious as it is spread through the air as well as through direct contact with other infected rabbits. Even if a rabbit has been successfully treated for the disease, they still remain a carrier and can transmit the disease to other rabbits for up to four weeks. The most adequate prevention is avoidance. If you plan on bringing your rabbit into public, do your research. Make sure you know of any recent outbreaks in your area. Also, while it may be tempting to allow others to handle your bunny, it is best to keep your distance. You never know what bacteria people may be carrying on their hands and clothing. We recommend limiting the more social visits to your bunny's home environment. Your fur baby will be more comfortable and you can ensure that others wash their hands before interacting with him/her. While this is in no means a fully comprehensive list of all the illnesses your bunny may encounter, we have hopefully made you more aware of some of the more common conditions. We encourage you to remember, that as with all illness, prevention is the key to a healthy and happy bunny! We recommend a minimum of once yearly visits to a veterinarian who specializes in rabbit care. If you would like assistance in finding a rabbit vet in your area please contact us.
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happymanesrabbitry
Nov 24, 2018
In BunsGiving 2018
Hop in and join the fun! Please introduce yourself and your bunny to be entered for a chance to win our door prize! Door prize: Happy Manes coffee/tea mug One bag of your choice of our delicious handcrafted bunny treats A set of our exclusive Thanksgiving chew toys One pack of plastic ball toys
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happymanesrabbitry
Nov 22, 2018
In BunsGiving 2018
The festivities start Friday November 23! Invite your friends and check in by 8:30 pm for a chance to win the door prize: One pack of your choice of cookies, one set of Thanksgiving chew toys, a set of ball toys, and a Happy Manes coffee mug!
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happymanesrabbitry
Nov 12, 2018
In Holiday Safety
Thanksgiving is a time for family, friends, and great food! However, with all the extra activity it can be a very stressful time for your bunny! We have compiled a list of tips and tricks to keep your bunny safe and happy! 1) Keep your bunny in a safe, quiet place. Bunnies can get stressed with excessive noise and activity. Ensure that your bunny has a safe, quiet place to hide away from guests and teach children not to pick up your bunny without proper supervision. 2) Absolutely NO Holiday Food! It may be tempting to share some of your holiday treats with your bunny. We do not recommend sharing anything with your bunny! Teach children and other guests to do the same. If you must, fresh uncooked veggies and small bits of bunny safe fruit are always a safe bet. Make sure to regulate how much your bunny is getting as excessive treats can make them very sick! Find a list of bunny safe vegetables here and bunny safe herbs here. You can also find bunny safe treats in our shop. 3) Help your bunny make sense of the chaos. Make sure to give your bunny special attention before and after guests leave. Monitor their behavior and ensure they remain stress-free and healthy. Take steps to ensure your bunny's safety as appropriate. Close the door to their room, place a blanket over their pen, turn down the lights, provide extra hay or even a special new toy! While you share your home with family and friends, don't forget about your furry family members! With our special holiday safety tips, you and your bunny are sure to have a safe and happy holiday!
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happymanesrabbitry
Oct 14, 2018
In Halloween Photo Contest
Prizes will be awarded for our choice of top 3 photos based on content, originality, and photo quality. Grand Prize: *Photo mug with your winning photo *$25 Visa gift card *Gift certificate for 40% off the entire Happy Manes Shop (excludes live bunnies) *2 bags of your choice of Happy Manes gourmet treats *One set of exclusive Halloween Chew toys 2nd Prize: *Winter Bunny Jacket in your choice of color (beige, brown, green, or red) *Gift certificate for 25% off the entire Happy Manes Shop (excludes live bunnies) *2 bags of your choice of Happy Manes gourmet treats *One set of exclusive Halloween Chew toys 3rd Prize *Gift certificate for 15% off the entire Happy Manes Shop (excludes live bunnies) *2 bags of your choice of Happy Manes gourmet treats *One set of exclusive Halloween Chew toys
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happymanesrabbitry
Sep 24, 2018
In Bunny Q&A
The idea of letting your fuzzy little bunny roam free throughout your home can be a little intimidating. No worries, it's easier than you may think! First Things First Bunnies are naturally curious and they may have instincts to burrow, dig, and chew, but with a few basic precautionary steps, you can create a safe, bunny friendly environment. Start by walking through your home, or the area you plan on letting your bunny roam, and note any potential hazards. Electrical cords should be removed from your bunny's reach, even when they stand on their back paws. If you are unable to remove any cords, they can be wrapped in electrical wrap (found at any home improvement store). Other potential hazards should also be removed from your bunny's environment. Think like a bunny! Anything they may want to chew, sniff, or dig in should be moved from your fuzzy friend's reach. Bunnies require mental stimulation. Place toys within easy reach for your bunny. The more options your bunny has to choose appropriate play things, the less likely they are to get into things they aren't supposed to. Don't worry, we will be sharing lots of tips and ideas for indoor boredom busters throughout the fall and winter! Apple tree branches, cat toys (without catnip), and wooden chews (we have them in our shop) are all good options for your bunny. Note your bunny's individual personality. Do they seem to enjoy digging? A cardboard box filled with paper shreddings or hay will keep your bunny occupied for hours! Watch how to make one here! Do you find them climbing to the highest possible spot in their cage? Try a cat tree with ramps so that they can sit on top and overlook their world. Do you have a big chewer? Grass mats and other wooden or grass toys are readily available at most pet stores and online. Do your homework and find what best suits your bunny and they will be happy and well behaved. Keep your Bunny Safe If your bunny enjoys climbing, you should ensure that anything they can climb or hop onto is secured and safe from access to potential dangers. Make sure they cannot hop over gates or fences or hop into containers or up stairs. If your bunny likes to dig, ensure that they cannot dig under fences or dig in plants. Also ensure that anything your bunny may want to nibble on is well out of reach. If you have other pets or small children, it is essential that your bunny remains safe. Pet or children's gates are a good option to give your bunny a safe place to explore while keeping them safe from potential harm. If you plan on keeping your bunny caged and only taking them out for supervised exercise, small animal exercise pens may be a good option. They can be easily assembled and disassembled when needed. These work well for supervised outdoor play as well. Another option for outdoor play is a harness and leash. You can either use a small dog harness, or one that is marketed specifically for rabbits. Once your bunny is used to the feel of the harness, they will love being able to hop around and explore the outdoors! Litter Training your Bunny Once you have your home bunny-safe, you may be worrying about his/her bathroom habits. Most bunnies can be easily litter trained. Begin by observing your furry friend's natural bathroom habits. Rabbits instinctively relieve themselves in only one area. Once you are confident where your bunny likes to go, place a litter pan filled with wood pellets, hay, or soft commercial bedding in that corner of their cage. When you notice your bunny relieving itself outside of the litter pan, gently place him/her inside the pan showing them that this is where you want him/her to go. After a few days, your bunny will recognize the scent of the litter and associate that with the appropriate place to go to the bathroom. If you notice poops outside the litter pan, place them in the pan re-enforcing the idea that the litter pan is the only appropriate bathroom spot. After a few more days, you should be able to allow your bunny out of it's enclosure and as long as they have free access to the litter pan, they should use it. Due to the fact that bunnies GI systems are constantly moving, you may find a few bunny poops outside of the litter pan, but they should consistently urinate in the litter pan with very few poops outside of the pan. Be sure to clean the litter pan daily as your bunny will be much less likely to use a dirty bathroom. Be careful with the litter you use, bunnies have sensitive skin and respiratory systems and some bunnies can even have allergies. Pine pellets are usually a safe choice. You can also use hay. Commercial products such as Carefresh are available as well, though these can be expensive. Bunnies tend to back into one corner of their litter pan before relieving themselves and a high backed rabbit litter pan will usually combat this issue. You can also use cat litter pans, just be sure that your bunny has plenty of room to sit down and that there are no sharp edges. Bunnies tend to prefer a bigger space. With a little care and consideration, you can create a safe, fun environment for your bunny to hop around and be a truly entertaining part of your family! SPECIAL DEAL We found this super cool play tunnel that we're sure your bunny will love! You can get 50% off until 10/17 if you follow this link Kitty City Large Cat Bed
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happymanesrabbitry
Sep 23, 2018
In Halloween Photo Contest
1. You must join our forum to enter. This is not the same as joining our mailing list and we will not send you any unsolicited e-mails. We will notify every participant of the winners and each placeholder (1st, 2nd, 3rd) will receive a personalized email notification. 2. Only one submission per user 3. Photo must be of your own, real bunny! No photo-bucket or google images will be considered. 4. You may use any props, costumes, photo stickers, etc. that you like. However, they must be Halloween or fall themed. 5. Please no explicit content! We want to keep things family friendly. Scary & fake gore is o.k (it is Halloween). No swearing or sexual innuendos. 6. Contest is open to worldwide participants. Prizes will be sent, if applicable, regardless of your location. 7. The contest ends at midnight October 28 and winners will be announced on Halloween, Wednesday October 31. Late submissions will not be considered. Please e-mail us or text us with any questions.
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happymanesrabbitry
Aug 21, 2018
In Products We Recommend
Whether your bunny has long fur or short, they all require a little bit of maintenance to keep them looking their best! From nail clippers to combs and brushes, we've compiled a list of our favorite grooming products! Fur & Coat Care Combs: *HBuir Wooden Handle Comb $5.59: This comb has this simple, yet durable design and at $5.59, it's super affordable! *ALJD Tear Stain Remover Combs $6.99: Who can go wrong with a comb shaped like a bunny! Plus, these combs come as a set of 2! What a great deal! *Detangling Pet Comb $13.99: While a little pricier, this comb has a double row of teeth for easy de-tangling which is a must for long haired rabbits! Brushes: *Hertzco Self Cleaning Slicker Brush $15.99: We love this brush! It has rounded bristles for added comfort. Plus, with a simple push of a button, the fur literally pops right out of the brush! *L'IL Pals Kitten Slicker Brush $1.75: Perfect for tiny bunnies and those hard to reach places! It's also super affordable! *JW Pet Company GripSoft Slicker Brush $5.99: This basic brush has a super soft grip for added comfort during long grooming sessions! Nail Trimmers: *Uleecy Pet Nail Clippers for Small Animals $9.99: These clippers are the perfect size for your bunny's small nails. They also have soft finger grips and they even come with a tiny nail file to smooth out rough edges! *JW Pet Company Deluxe Nail Trimmer $4.49: These "guilletine style" clippers tend to be slightly gentler on your bunny's nails and with the comfort grips and low price, it's a win-win! * Dremel 7300-PT 4.8V Pet Nail Grooming Tool $25.99: While a bit more expensive, we love nail grinders! This model is small and cordless and comes with a variety of different grinding wheels for every size bunny! It has a good overall rating for silence and it's made by a trusted brand, so you know you are getting a quality product with easy to find replacement parts! Grooming your bunny is an essential part of their overall care and grooming time should be a stress-free bonding opportunity for you and your bunny! We believe any of these products will help your bunny be happier and healthier for years to come!
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happymanesrabbitry
Jul 08, 2018
In Product Suggestions
Is there a treat, flavor, or toy that you would like to see in our shop? Let us know! If we choose to create and sell your idea, we will send you a free sample of the finished product and feature your name on our site as a contributor!
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happymanesrabbitry
Jun 03, 2018
In Bunny Health 101
As the weather heats up, we look for ways to keep ourselves cool during the hot summer days! Our bunnies need to cool off too! Left unprotected, your bunny can suffer from heat related illnesses including dehydration, heat stroke, and even death! Below, we will discuss the signs and symptoms of an overheated bunny as well as ways to prevent heat stroke and keep your bunny cool and happy! Unlike humans, rabbits cannot regulate their body temperature by sweating. Nor can they pant like dogs. Instead, they use their ears to cool themselves and yes, the bigger the ears, the easier it is for a bunny to keep cool. However, rabbits have a number of factors working against them when it comes to heat tolerance. For one, most rabbits have a dense coat of fur. They also have short nasal passages which decrease their ability to breath effectively in warm weather. These factors coupled with their small size puts your bunny at increased risk of overheating. Early signs that your bunny is too warm include rapid breathing, decreased activity, lack of appetite, increased water consumption, and restlessness. If left untreated, these symptoms can progress to Heat Stroke, signs of which include reddening of the ears, panting, salivating, weakness, confusion, and convulsions! If ignored, these symptoms will lead to death! Heat Stroke progresses quickly, therefore your bunny MUST be kept cool and comfortable at all times! Our rule of thumb is if you are comfortable, your bunny is too! There are many ways to keep your bunny cool and comfortable in the hot weather. If your bunny is indoors, simply running fans or air conditioning will do the trick. Another simple and cheap way to ensure your bunny stays comfortable is to provide them with frozen water bottles. You can also freeze some of their favorite fruits and offer them as treats. Watch our video on how to make Blueberry Bunny Pops! If your bunny is housed outdoors, ensure they have constant access to fresh, cold water as well as a cool, dark place to escape the harsh summer sun. Consider relocating your bunny to your basement or garage to provide a cooler, more temperature controlled environment. Good grooming is also essential to keeping your bunny cool. Regular brushing, even with short fur, will help remove uncomfortable loose fur and prevent mats. We do offer grooming services for those of you in the Albany, NY area. You can book an appointment here Bunny Spa Package for Long Fur Bunny Spa Package for Short Fur As we all know, the summer months can be hot and uncomfortable. When it comes to keeping your bunny cool, you are their greatest ally so get creative, and be sure to monitor for signs of overheating and heat stroke! How do you keep your bunny cool in the summer? Share your tips and tricks below!
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happymanesrabbitry
May 23, 2018
In Products We Recommend
You want the best for your bunny, and so do we! When it comes to a home, your bunny needs plenty of room to roam with tons of safety and convenience built in! Here are a few of our top choices for bunny enclosures. 1. Precision Pet Two Door Great Crate Dog crates make great rabbit pens not just because of their size, but also for their easy to clean design. This particular pen not only has a removable bottom tray with a flat, bunny friendly floor, it also has two doors which make for easier cleaning. The side-open door allows for easy attachment of a play gate! The sturdy metal is rust resistant and the hard plastic bottom tray is designed to prevent accidents spilling onto your floors. The vertical side bars are well spaced allowing for attachment of water bottles and hay feeders as well as ledges and perches for your bunny to relax and climb on. The bars across the top make great attachment points for hanging treat feeders and other toys! While this crate comes in multiple sizes, we like the medium 36" design. Compared to other pens of the same size, the price is very reasonable. You can find this pen on Amazon for only $49.25. 2. Internet's Best Wire Dog Kennel In addition to all of the great features in the Precision Pet model above, this crate comes in some adorable colors such as blue, black, and pink! There's still a side open door and it's also fold-able for easy storage and travel. The price tag is a little higher, but again, we believe that it is still a great value! Grab a medium 36" pen for $53.99 on Amazon! Stay tuned as we will be posting new product recommendations regularly!
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happymanesrabbitry
Apr 28, 2018
In Bunny Health 101
There has been a great deal of concern surrounding a recent out break of the deadly Viral Hemorrhagic Disease in Canada. Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV2) was first recognized in a shelter in British Colombia where total of 36 rabbits died suddenly from the devastating disease. Cases have since been reported in the Vancouver Island communities of Nanaimo and Comox as well as the mainland city of Delta, B.C. So far, there have been no reports of the illness in the United States. So what’s so scary about this disease and where did it come from? Symptoms of this deadly disease include loss of appetite, lethargy or extreme tiredness, high fever above 105 F, spasms, and sudden death. Infected rabbits usually die within 12-36 hours of contracting the virus though they have been know to survive for up to 10 days. The mortality rate tends to be extremely high with 50%-100% of rabbits succumbing to the disease. The virus was originally curated in New Zealand to combat the overpopulation of feral rabbits on the island. While there have been prior instances of RHDV in North America, the disease was not known to affect native North American rabbits. The RHDV2 strain seems to be different. As shelters and zoos scramble to obtain the preventative vaccine from Europe, us American bunny owners can’t help but wonder “is my bunny at risk?” This virus is extremely contagious and can be spread by direct contact with infected rabbits including anything the rabbit may have come in contact with such as clothing, food, animal waste, other animals, and even humans. However, there have been no reported cases in the United States thus far and the rabbits known to have been affected have been quarantined. As of April 17, Vancouver and British Columbia have received the preventative vaccine. However, the risk is still present. Washington state has recently cancelled rabbit shows and implemented measures to prevent potentially infectious rabbits from entering the country. Therefore, as responsible bunny owners, we should take an approach of caution. To keep your precious bunny safe, we have compiled a list of preventative measures. 1. Know your bunny: Monitor your bunny’s mannerisms. Are they eating and drinking normally? What is their activity level? Are they acting like themselves or does something “seem off?” Often times a subtle change in behavior is the only sign of illness that your bunny will reveal. 2. Keep it clean: Wash your hands before and after handling your bunny, their food, or their waste. If you believe you may have come in contact with a sick bunny, change your clothing and remove your shoes prior to entering your bunny’s environment. 3. Keep your bunny indoors or at least in a safe area. Don’t allow your bunny to come in contact with any other animals or humans that you are unsure of. 4. Educate yourself. Research RHDV2 and keep yourself up to date on the incident in Canada. Ask your vet and talk with other rabbit owners. Keep yourself informed! What is your opinion on this topic? Do you have any information to share with the bunny community? Go ahead and post your comments below. Additional resources: Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (VHD) Vancouver Zoo Quarantines Rabbits to Protect them from Deadly Virus First Shipment of Rabbit Disease Vaccine Arrives in B.C. Vaccine Against Deadly Rabbit Disease Coming to B.C.
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happymanesrabbitry
Apr 28, 2018
In Spring Photo Contest
Thank you to all who participated! We always love seeing your beautiful bunnies! 1st Place: Happy Easter!!! Submitted by blondiekoler 2nd Place: Sleepy Spring Fling King "Lyric" submitted by Lyric's Mom Each participant received an e-mail from us with instructions on how to claim their prize! If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us! Keep your ears perked for our next contest!
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happymanesrabbitry
Apr 26, 2018
In Spring Photo Contest
Thanks to everyone who participated! The winner will be announced tomorrow, so stay tuned!
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happymanesrabbitry
Apr 11, 2018
In Plant a Bunny Garden
As an amazing bunny parent, you know how important fresh vegetables and herbs are to your bunny's diet (and yours). Now is the time to get outdoors and begin planting all of those luscious greens! Even if you don't have a yard, you can plant some bunny-friendly veggies and herbs in your home window boxes. So put your bunny on a lead, grab a trowel, and get ready for some spring planting! 1. First, you'll need to gather supplies. You can find gardening tools here. Of course, you will need flower pots and soil as well. 2. Your bunny will want to dig in the dirt, so make sure you leave him/her plenty of space in the garden to create an adequate bunny burrow palace! He/she may even enjoy playing with the flower pots. 3. Make sure you consult with your bunny on appropriate plantings. There is no telling how an angry bunny may react to finding that you didn't plant his favorite veggie. For a comprehensive list of bunny safe veggies and herbs you can follow the links below. Bunny Safe Vegetables Bunny Safe Herbs & Their Uses 4. Don't forget to water your little seedlings and place the pots in a warm and sunny window! We like this watering can 5. After you clean up your mess, your bunny will be tired from all of that digging and chewing. Make sure that he/she has a nice cozy place to nap. 6. Make sure to care for your seedlings ensuring they have adequate sunlight and water. When they are fully grown, you can let your bunny nibble on them straight from the pot (as long as you didn't use pesticides of course) or you can pick them and make a yummy salad to share! 7. Don't forget to share pictures of your gardening adventures with us here on the Bunny Blog and on any of our social media channels! Facebook Twitter Instagram Pinterest In case you missed it! A link to all of the items needed to complete this project: Gardening tools Flower Pots Potting Soil Bunny Safe Vegetables Bunny Safe Herbs Watering Can
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happymanesrabbitry
Apr 11, 2018
In Spring Photo Contest
1st Prize: Custom Mug with the winning photo, 2 packages of your choice of our hand-made bunny treats, a package of our hand-made chew blocks, and a $25 Visa gift card! 2nd Prize: Bunny Harness & Leash, 2 packages of your choice of our hand-made bunny treats, a package of our hand-made chew blocks, and a $15 iTunes gift card! 3rd Prize: 2 Packages of your choice of our hand-made bunny treats, a package of our hand-made chew blocks, and a $5 gift card to our shop!
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happymanesrabbitry
Mar 10, 2018
In Spring Photo Contest
1. You must join our forum to enter. This is not the same as joining our mailing list and we will not send you any unsolicited e-mails. We will notify every participant of the winners and each placeholder (1st, 2nd, 3rd) will receive a personalized email notification. 2. Only one submission per user 3. Photo must be of your own, real bunny! No photo-bucket or google images will be considered. 4. You may use any props, costumes, photo stickers, etc. that you like. However, they must have a spring theme. 5. Please no explicit content! We want to keep things family friendly. 6. Contest is open to worldwide participants. Prizes will be sent, if applicable, regardless of your location. 7. The contest ends at midnight April 24 and winners will be announced on April 27. Late submissions will not be considered. 8. Winners will be chosen based on best photo with consideration to photo quality and originality, so be creative! Please e-mail us or text us with any questions.
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happymanesrabbitry
Mar 10, 2018
In Bunny Q&A
Supplements can be used as complementary therapy for many things such as pain relief or the prevention of certain ailments. If your rabbit is recovering from surgery, suffering from illness or old age, you can give them supplements to maintain their health. Possible ailments include: Pain Urinary tract complications Digestive or gut flora complications Obesity Fertility issues Supplements support the overall health of your bunny and help to ensure 100% function. We strongly recommend that you do not use supplements in place of proper veterinary care, rather they should be used to complement your bunny's prescribed treatments.
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happymanesrabbitry
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